GUT HEALTH

WHAT IS THE GUT?

  • Your Microbiome - a community of microorganisms (such as bacteria, fungi, and viruses) that inhabit a particular environment and especially the collection of microorganisms living in or on the human body.
  • Your Digestive System - food breakdown, absorption, and utilization
  • Your Enteric Nervous System - a part of the autonomic nervous system, the brain to gut connection

What Is The Gut For?

  • Immune System - priority
  • Food Utilization - priority
  • Mood Regulation
  • Appetite Regulation
  • Support Hormonal Regulation

KNOW YOUR GUT

RISKS & SYMPTOMS

  • Changes in BM
  • Appearance of BM changes
  • Persistent Bloating & Gas
  • Acid Reflux
  • Food Sensitivities
  • Changes in Skin
  • Chronic Stress
  • Chronic Fatigue
  • Family History of GI disease

TESTING & MORE

  • Stool Sample (uBiome)
  • Organic Acid Testing (Urine)
  • C-Reactive Protein (Inflammation)
  • Zonulin Testing (Leaky Gut)
  • Breath Testing (specific carbohydrates)
  • Celiac Disease Testing (blood work, biopsy)
  • Food Allergies (blood work)
  • Elimination Diet / FODMAP

YOUR MICROBIOME STORY

  The Womb   Birth & Infancy   Childhood   Adulthood

THE STRESS RESPONSE

During an inflammatory response, immune cells are released and adrenal glands release cortisol. This causes and increase of cardiac output, blood glucose, heart rate, and blood pressure, as well as a greater colonic activity that can or may manifest itself into unfavorable symptoms such as changes in bowel movement, increased gut lining permeability (food compounds that shouldn’t get through the GI lining can get through), changes in skin and overall decline in health.

THE SECOND BRAIN

A deeper understanding of this mass of neural tissue, filled with important neurotransmitters, is revealing that it does much more than merely handle digestion or inflict the occasional nervous pang. The little brain in our innards, in connection with the big one in our skulls, partly determines our mental state (e.g., serotonin and dopamine response) and plays key roles in certain diseases throughout the body.

SUPPORTING YOUR INTERNAL GARDEN. WEED, FEED, & SEED

Weed - limit intake of added sugar, alcohol, research impact of your medications, limit intake of pseudo food/overly processed foods, and integrate movement consistently (get outside), monitor cleaning supplies, skin care products and other at-home variables that could be substituted to support your external and internal health
Feed - prioritize fiber-rich plant consumption especially the intake of vegetables, integrate fermented foods (e.g., sauerkraut), integrate cultured foods (e.g., kefir), ensure adequate omega-3 fatty acids
Seed - consider integrating probiotic on a daily basis (review with trusted health professional), digestive enzymes, krill oil supplementation, ensure adequate vitamin A, vitamin C and vitamin E from your food and consider vitamin D3 supplementation if necessary

RECOMMENDATIONS

  • Eat Dirt by Dr. Josh Axe
  • The Microbiome Solution by Dr. Robynne Chutkan
  • Human Microbiome Project: https://hmpdacc.org/ (National Institute of Health)